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Archive for April 2nd, 2009

HERBS DESCRIPTION: BASIL

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

Sweet Basil Ocymum basilicum Bush Basil Ocymum minimum LABIATAE Basil has been called the king of all the herbs. Its name has been attributed to two different origins, some writers saying it comes from basileus, Greek for “king”, but basilicus—basilisk, the old name for serpent—could refer to its reputation for counteracting poison from the bite [...]

WHAT CONDITIONS DO HERBS REQUIRE? FEEDING

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

Food for the young plants is best put into the soil before they are set out, particularly with a perennial bed, which will not be disturbed again for several years. I have found the only fertilizers to use are the natural organic manures and compost. All my own herbs are organically grown, with no chemical [...]

SOUTHERNWOOD: USING

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

Dry the leaves, crumble them, and store with woollens to keep the moths away. Its ether-like smell is repugnant to them. Southernwood tea is also prescribed when people are convalescing from the flu: it helps combat the bodily weakness and pains in the limbs suffered with this wretched illness. It can tone up the skin, [...]

LOVAGE: DESCRIPTION

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

Levisticum officinale UMBELLIFERAE Lovage is a very difficult herb to grow in its germination and seedling stage, and also a very slow starter, and this seems to have discouraged many herb fanciers from cultivating it in their gardens. The seeds take weeks and sometimes months to germinate and, unlike other herbs, need cool conditions for [...]

COMFREY: PLANTING AND GROWING

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

The comfrey plant is a vigorously growing one. Its roots will forage deep down into the subsoil, dredging up the stores of minerals and nutrients often sadly lacking in depleted topsoil. It has been used by farmers to break up new heavy ground before planting foodcrops. After the foliage is ploughed in to decompose and [...]